Josh Berry's New Full-Time Ride with JRM "Obviously Very Rewarding, Very Special"

 

Josh Berry’s Cinderella story continues as he is set to take over the #8 JR Motorsports Chevrolet full-time in 2022, the team announced August 16th

 

Berry was originally slated to run a part-time schedule of 12 races for JRM in 2021, keeping the #8 car’s seat warm until Sam Mayer’s 18th birthday, at which point Mayer would take over the ride.  However, Berry made the most of his opportunity, earning his first Xfinity race win, the Cook Out 250 at Martinsville in April.

 

The win turned some heads, and led to three extra Xfinity races (so far) with Jordan Anderson Racing.  He was also tapped for a couple of COVID-related emergency fill-ins, including his first Cup Series race with Spire Motorsports. 

 

His quick success has resulted in a few different offers for his 2022 plans, but ultimately he decided to stay with the team that gave him his first Xfinity ride back in 2014.  “JR Motorsports was pretty open with me the whole time about where we were at. I had a couple of decent, I mean, good offers to do other things, but this is where I wanted to be, I wanted to race the Xfinity Series.”

 

As for sponsorship, Tire Pros has announced they will partner with Josh Berry and JRM for nine races in 2022.  “That’s been a really amazing relationship for me.  They’re a big part of putting me where I am this year,” Berry told the media Tuesday morning. 

 

For now, there are still decisions to be made about the #8 Chevrolet’s crew chief in 2022.  Berry says “I’m going to be in the #8, that’s about all we’ve got settled.”  He was also able to confirm that Sam Mayer will return to JRM in 2022, saying “They announced me as the driver of the #8, [Mayer] will still be at JRM, just a different car number.”

 

As for his plans for the rest of 2021, Berry says “They’re still kind of fluid.  I want to continue to race the Rackley WAR [#25] truck for the rest of the season.”  He also hopes to run a couple more races with Jordan Anderson Racing, and continue to “run late model cars as much as [he] can.”